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DCscenes IV
Taking Thee to the Streets of D.C.

 

1984 base Clergy plate no. 969. Click here to return to the Clergy section of the Non-Passenger plates page.1984 base Clergy plate no. 783. Click here to return to the Clergy section of the Non-Passenger plates page.The observation of Clergy plates in use is a rare occurrence, but Johnny Miles spotted these two in use during his travels around the District. Note that both examples have the oblong bolt holes characteristic of the earliest 1984 baseplates. This doesn't necessarily mean that they had been in use for more than 25 years when photographed in 2010, however, because due to the low volume in which Clergy plates are issued, they could have been assigned years after they were manufactured.

Number 969 is on a Honda Civic that was parked at Windom Pl. and 38t St., NW, when it was observed in mid-2010.

Number 783 is displayed on a 2005 Chrysler 300C that was parked at a boathouse at the Tidal Basin, off Maine Ave. SW, when it was photographed.

 

2007 base Office of Foreign Missions diplomat plate no. DLN0632. Click here to return to the OFM plates page.Look carefully and you'll see not just one, but two OFM 2007 baseplates in this photo taken by Johnny Miles. Fastened to the Ferrari California is a Diplomat plate, but our old country code list provides no clue as to to which nation the LN code is assigned.

On the front of the oncoming PT Cruiser is an Embassy Staff plate, number SDJ1796, and our list indicates that DJ was at one time (and likely still is) assigned to the French embassy.

The scene is the intersection of Canal and Foxhall Roads, NW, in Georgetown. The California is a convertible GT with a retractable hardtop.

 

Johnny Miles photographed this Jaguar XJS with the seventh reserved-number plate assigned for the 2011-12 registration year.

 

Click here to return to the Reserved-Number Plates page.

 

1938 Truck plate no. B4300. Click here to return to the 1935-47 section of our Truck plates page.That vehicle graphics have been used for advertising purposes for at least 75 years is shown with this 1938 photo of a Dodge truck with an image of a lobster on the front left fender. Unfortunately not enough of the markings on the door are visible to identify the business name and location, but presumably this vehicle was operated by a seafood company or similar establishment.

This Dodge appears to be a light pickup or delivery van of the 1937 model year. Image provided by Charlie Gauthier.

 



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This page last updated on January 1, 2017

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